THE FAERY REHISTORY

A powerfully re-imagined Victorian Ireland where a strong queen rules and the world of Faery is just a heartbeat away
— MARY JO PUTNEY, BESTSELLING AUTHOR
Many thanks to the awesome photographers on Pixabay whose work I've used (though the photo in the bottom left corner I took myself!):  enriquelopezgarre ,  Lindsay66 , and  alandiaspirits .

Many thanks to the awesome photographers on Pixabay whose work I've used (though the photo in the bottom left corner I took myself!): enriquelopezgarre, Lindsay66, and alandiaspirits.

I am so excited to introduce you to my new fantasy historical romance trilogy, The Faery Rehistory, coming from Blackstone Publishing! The first book in the series, The Absinthe Earl, will be released Oct. 15.

If you've read my science fiction romances, you've probably picked up on the fact that I love Ireland. I've always wanted to create a fantasy world based on Irish mythology, and fairies in particular. The Faery Rehistory weaves Ireland's ancient mythological races with Victorian-era technology and manners into an Ireland that was never conquered by the British.

The books in the series are: The Absinthe Earl, The Raven Lady, and The Warrior Poet. The alcoholic spirit absinthe—which is sometimes referred to as "the green fairy"—plays a part in all three of the books, but especially the first. There are steampunk elements such as airships and mechanical creatures, and the cast of colorful characters includes a half-mad Irish queen, Tuatha De Danaan warriors, an alchemist, a fairy king, a pirate queen, and a time-traveling poet.

In book one, The Absinthe Earl, you'll meet Miss Ada Quicksilver, a scholar of fairy lore and student of London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, and Lord Edward Donoghue, the Irish Earl of Meath and a man with a dark secret. You can read the first chapter of the novel here.

Fans of Gail Carriger and Leanna Renee Hieber will savor this promising series opener.
— PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY
It’s a world that comes alive with mysterious, foggy moors, dangerous peat bogs, and gorgeous green hills.
— Kirkus
Sharon Fisher