11.03.2012

Saturday report from the blog tour!

GUEST POSTS

Blog Spot Reviews - Smart is the New Sexy
Urban Fantasy Investigations - Books That Inspire Books
Basia's Bookshelf - Kiss Me, I'm (Almost) Irish

REVIEWS


Book Chick City

I find myself having to reign myself in whilst writing this review, as I really could go on for ages about GHOST PLANET. I really loved the concept, and truly would love to visit, just to see who would be following me around. The chemistry between Murphy and Elizabeth is smouldering . . . The world building really is wonderful, and you get a real sense of what Ardagh 1 is like, from its civilised bits, to its rougher, more natural, areas . . . There are characters in GHOST PLANET that you just feel like slapping, others you really feel for, and some that you just want to see what happens next with them.


Basia's Bookshelf

So Halloween has passed and I thought I was done with stories that would raise the hair on my arms for another year. One chapter into Ghost Planet and I had goose pimples and until I closed the book, I felt like I was on a roller coaster of emotions – but I kept those goose pimples. This is a scary, smart, sexy story that occasionally had me doubting my own thoughts as I read.
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The story is quite serious: there are themes of prejudice, environmentalism, slavery and oppression among the old faithful standards of greed, fanaticism and jealousy. This still has some light and fun moments and Elizabeth is a bright beacon of a character. She’s generally just irrepressible, pretty much corrupting other ghosts by talking to them and driving Murphy crazy by making her presence in his life impossible for him to ignore. 
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The romance with Murphy is so, so sweet. He’s just so damn adorable and sexy. It’s not all because he’s a yummy Irish guy who absently calls her, “love,” all the time. It’s not his startlingly blue eyes or that he’s practically a chef. Even when he’s trying to ignore Elizabeth, he does it courteously and is protective. I loved that when she started to work out her theories, Murphy was willing to rethink his own. 
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. . . the halves of the book are like mirror images, mimicking the ghost/person relationship. I loved the way Fisher split the story, showing that both sides had their fanatics and neither had any particular grasp of the true answer because they were so busy proving they were on some moral high ground.
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I loved this. That’s pretty much the beginning and end of it.


Janicu's Book Blog

Until she’s told she’s a ghost, Elizabeth doesn’t realize anything is wrong, and her shock and confusion at having her most basic identity questioned is good stuff. The irony is that the human Elizabeth was interested in the ‘ghosts’ from an academic standpoint before traveling to Ardagh 1. Now her experience with the Ghost Protocol is much more personal and her questions about her existence much more pressing.
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Elizabeth’s persistence and Murphy’s empathy were characteristics that brought them closer, but the connection they forged from quiet proximity had it’s own power.
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. . . this is a story with a healthy amount of romance but has a plot that doesn’t just evolve around that. There are some suspenseful, action-adventure aspects to the story and Elizabeth and Murphy have to face several threats to their lives. I can’t really go into these without spoiling the story, but I was impressed by how thoughtfully Ghost Planet explores the the ‘ghost’ concept in its storytelling. It’s a concept that’s also a mystery, and thankfully the author doesn’t leave the reader with a lot of hanging questions. It explores a lot of the questions I had and organically integrated the answers into the plot.

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